Tag Archives: oakland raiders

The Price Is Wrong For Palmer

The Raiders paid a hefty price for Carson Palmer.

Let me tell you bad of an idea it is that the Oakland Raiders gave up so much for Carson Palmer:

First of all look at Carson Palmer’s production last year. he threw for over 4000 yards again but most of it came in garbage time as the Cincinnati Bengals limped to a 4-12 record and a massive overhaul in the offseason. Palmer was deceptively horrible as he consistently overthrew receivers, threw horrible interceptions and killed more Bengals drives then I can remember. People want to blame Chad Ochocinco for all of the issues in Cinci last year but it’s not his fault that Palmer couldn’t hit him, Terrell Owens, Jermaine Gresham, Jordan Shipley or any of their 89 talented receivers at all.

Palmer should’ve taken most of the fall for that season because it was all on his shoulders. Ever since his knee injury in the playoffs against the Steelers years ago Palmer hasn’t been the same QB. Maybe he’s scared to get hit but the simple fact is that he wasn’t losing accuracy and arm strength and couldn’t get the ball up the field at all.

Speaking of blame here’s reason number two; Palmer’s attitude towards the Bengals was a joke. People kept making excuses for Palmer’s behavior saying that it was because Bengals ownership is extremely cheap (which is a fact) and that they didn’t want to build a winner. Reality is that the Bengals were building something and all of Palmer’s backers didn’t want to see it.

The team had just come off of a AFC North title and added players through the draft and gave Palmer more weapons than you could imagine. It was up to Palmer to make it work and he didn’t. instead of bearing down and going at it again he whined, complained moaned and wanted out of Cinci. He told ownership that he would rather retire than play another game in Cinci and bragged that he had $80 million in the bank to work with.

So Bengals Owner Mike Brown did what most GM’s should do in this situation, he told Palmer to stay home, drafted Andy Dalton and moved forward.

(side note: let’s give props to Mike Brown for not punking out to a player’s demands. Brown isn’t the most liked guy in Southern Ohio but he showed gumption in pressing ahead and not giving in to Palmer’s demands and did what was right for the team. what he got was a steal of a deal and more insurance for the Bengals future as the team looks like it’s getting better by the week.)

Andy Dalton is doing just fine in Palmer's place in Cinci.

That brings us to point three; do you see the Bengals without Palmer in the locker room? When the Colts lost Peyton Manning they fell flat on their face and haven’t gotten up since. The Bengals have thrived with Dalton who looks like the real deal and A.J. Green who is a beast of a wide receiver and will only get better. If Palmer is such an elite QB then why is a his now former team, who were supposed to be terrible, 4-2 and talking about the playoffs?

There have been whispers about how the locker room is much more peaceful and fun without Palmer (or Ochocinco) in it. is this really a guy you want to carry your team to the playoffs.

The final point is this; the Raiders gave the Bengals 2 possible first round picks in this year and next year’s draft to get Palmer. That’s insane.

No other team in their right mind would pay that much for a QB especially now that draft picks are much cheaper and when you look at the fact that scouts all say that Palmer isn’t the same QB as he was before 2005.

I don’t care how good of a relationship Palmer has with head coach Hue Jackson, or the fact that you needed a QB, the price was too high for a QB that is not elite, has arm and accuracy issues, and hasn’t played a game all year long.

Also think about his, you gave up a 3rd round pick in the supplemental draft to get Terrell Pryor and make him your QB of the future. That’s three picks you handed off for QB’s and one might never see the light of day in Oakland. if the Palmer deal doesn’t work then the Raiders just killed themselves for two years in the draft and could fall right back to the 5 or 4 win plateau in no time.

This experiment gets started this weekend as Palmer will get his first start of the season against the suddenly awoken Kansas City Chiefs. Palmer will have to get to know his receivers quickly and get the offense down just as quick.

If he does and the Raiders are successful then forget I ever wrote this blog…

But if he doesn’t then the Raiders will pay dearly, and Mike Brown will reap the rewards of it.


The Decision: Jim Harbaugh Style

 

Harbaugh had a tough decision after his best moment as coach at Stanford.

THIS BLOG WAS SUPPOSED TO BE PUBLISHED BACK IN JANUARY BUT I GUESS I GOT SIDE TRACKED AND FORGOT ABOUT… FAIL!!! ANYWAY ENJOY IT NOW ONLY TEN MONTHS TOO LATE…

Of course Stanford people all feel that Jim Harbaugh should come back to Palo Alto. How would you feel about a guy that took over a 1-11 program at the bottom of the PAC-10 and took them to 12-1, an Orange Bowl win and a dark-horse national title contender in 2011?

With Andrew Luck returning for his junior year (redshift) earlier today all Harbaugh needs to do is sign a new deal and Stanford has it’s two main ingredients to make a charge to New Orleans in 2012.

The problem is that Harbaugh, unlike most sought after coaches who ditch their programs for greener pastures (Randy Edsall) is not under contract. Harbaugh can technically do what he wants to do. There are no obligations, no buyouts and no ditching bailing out on the responsibilities of the program he signed on with.

He’s a free agent, if you noticed he hasn’t asked to go anywhere because everyone is coming to him. The Miami Dolphins flew in to see him, Oakland and San Fran drove to his house to speak to him, he’s having his own LeBron James moment right now.

So the question in that sense truly is “What should he do?” Should he be like Gary Patterson and be loyal to the program he built up to it’s current glorious position and continue to build? As great as that sounds shouldn’t he also factor in the Greg Schiano factor?

Schiano is the Rutgers head coach who could’ve left while the iron was hot and taken the Miami or Michigan jobs when they were available. What he did instead was stay in Piscataway to try an build on the success that he had recently acquired from a 10-2 campaign in 2006. The result? Rutgers has returned to it’s mediocre ways and finished 4-8 this year and Schiano is stuck there.

Should he go back to his alma mater in Ann Arbor and resurrect Michigan?

Harbaugh chose San Francisco and hasnt looked back.

He played quarterback there and seems like the perfect guy to lead the maize and blue with his pro-style offense and tough demeanor. The problem is that the players currently in place are meant for a spread offense and his defense is… well… non existent. He has one big rebuilding job to in Ann Arbor that will be tougher to do than at Palo Alto due to the legacy and tradition at Michigan. He’ll have more room to breathe than Rich Rodriguez ever had but the pressure will be fierce no less.

What about the NFL? The 49ers and Raiders are a stones throw from his house and he’ll have to very young and talented teams at his disposal.

He has the backs (Frank Gore and Darren McFadden), the receivers (Vernon Davis and Jacoby Ford) and two pretty strong defenses, all each team needs is a QB and he should be set.

Except would you want to work for Al Davis in Oakland or the York family in San Francisco? The York clan has all but destroyed a once great franchise with their cheapness and ineffective way ls of running a franchise. As far as Davis goes… ask Art Shell, Lane Kiffin and Tom Cable how trying to work with the walking corpse turns out.

Miami? Eh. You’re QB is a Michigan man in Chad Henne, but he’s a bum. Then there’s the lack of a running game and questions in the middle of that defense.

What about Carolina? You get Jimmy Clausen… ok scratch that.

You see the myriad of decisions facing Harbaugh. He could stay at Stanford and contend for a title in the immediate future, resurrect one of the greatest college programs ever, return two legendary NFL teams to glory and duplicate the success of his brother John in Baltimore or who knows what.

Whatever his decision is it ain’t going to be an easy one. It’s a gift and a curse to be this wanted. Everyone adores you, but the wrong decision could set you back for a long time (Schiano, Rich Rod and Dan Hawkins). Harbaugh’s decision is way bigger than LeBron’s because it could affect two separate divisions of football at once. Heisman and a title, hail to the victors, or commitment to excellence… what should he do?


The End Of The Randy Moss Odyssey

Randy Moss retires with a lot left to give.

Randy Moss was the nastiest receiver that ever graced an NFL field. He was a specimen that the game had never seen before and waved in a new era for the wide receiver position.

He was huge, a 6’4″ beanpole that ran like a gazelle and left defensive backs in the dust. All you had to do was throw the ball up and Moss would come down with it.

His brilliance was first displayed on Thanksgiving in a game against the Dallas Cowboys. Moss only caught 4 balls, but 3 of them were for touchdowns as Randall Cunningham let loose bomb after bomb and Moss basically cherry picked them away from Dallas defenders and left a trail of dust behind him.

After that game every Minnesota Vikings game became an event, and Moss was the main attraction.

Whether it was Lambeau Field, The Superdome, anywhere, you had to see Moss and what he was about to do to defenders.

In the pantheon of receivers if Jerry Rice is Babe Ruth, Moss was Willie Mays. He was a highlight reel that could change any game at any time with one play.

Yesterday Moss retired from the NFL 58 catches away from 1000, 150 yards away from 15,000 and with so much more left in his tank that it’s puzzling that Moss would think of retiring even after one of his most disappointing seasons ever.

Three years ago Moss was a top 3 receiver coming off of an historic year where he set the NFL record for touchdowns in a season with 23. The next year without Tom Brady under center due to injury, Moss still hauled in 11 scores and had over 1000 yards and repeated the same feat the next year.

So to say that Moss was finished even after the season from hell would be foolish.

Moss’s year started by playing hardball with the Patriots to get a new deal. It led to him being traded to back to the Vikings where an outburst at a restaurant had him sent to Tennessee. There he sat in purgatory as a decoy who couldn’t get a sniff of the ball and wallowed in pity.

Moss realized that he screwed himself by thumbing his nose at the Patriots and thought that he was still a hot commodity.

Randy Moss broke the NFL record most touchdown receptions in a single seaosn.

In reality Moss should’ve realized that in the Belichick system anyone is replaceable. Once he did it was too late.

This offseason it looked as if Moss was more motivated than ever to return to form as he rounded himself into the best shape if his life according to sources and was primed for a return to the top.

However, once his primary teams the Patriots and Jets took a chance on Chad Ochocinco and Plaxico Burress, Moss’s own interest waned and he announced his retirement to the world.

Rather than stay in mediocrity with a team that he felt wouldn’t help him win a title, Moss decided to walk away even though he still has so much left in the tank.

If this truly is the end then Moss will have added another chapter of controversy to his legacy.

As great of a player as he was, Moss was known just as much for being a knucklehead.

There was the traffic stop in Minneapolis where he hit an officer with his car, incidents on the field where he walked off before time expired against the Redskins, squirting a water bottle a ref, pretending to moon the crowd in Green Bay after a touchdown.

More than anything there was the fact that Moss never always gave his best, and admitted it.

Moss took plays off and told us all about it. He was aloof for 40% of every game an never cared what we thought.

That to me is the most frustrating part of Moss’s career if this truly is the end. Imagine how even more amazing his numbers would be if he went all out every time. Imagine how much greater he could’ve been if he cared more than he didn’t.

His retirement mirrors the way he played the game. He wanted to do things his way and if he couldn’t then he didn’t want to do it at all. Moss could’ve been better than Jerry Rice, could’ve set all kinds of records and could’ve been regarded as one of the best people in the game… However, he couldn’t compromise.

He couldn’t keep his mouth shut in New England when he wanted a new deal, he couldn’t be professional in Oakland, he couldn’t listen to anyone in Minnesota and in the end he couldn’t take what was given to him during this period of free agency.

It’s sad really. Moss could help the Cowboys as a deep threat, the Falcons as another option next to Roddy White, the Steelers as a red zone threat for Ben Roethlisberger… he can win a ring this year by just fitting in and doing what’s asked of him.

However, that’s not Randy Moss. Moss has been the star attraction since he came into the league and that’s how he wants it to stay.

So we have to say good-bye to Moss. Moss was one of the best at his position and will sit in the Hall of Fame  as one of the greats all time due to his skill set and stunning athleticism.

But he could’ve been so much more.


Are The Yankees The Next Empire To Fall

Was the Soriano deal a sign of a possible downturn for the New York Yankees?

Did you notice a trend that has happened in sports in the last ten years?

The death of the traditional power.

Think about this for a second; how many traditional sports powers took hits to their pride and luster in the last 10-15 years?

In college football Notre Dame still thinks that they will wake up the echoes in a matter if time and Michigan still considers itself to be the gold standard even when no when, I mean no one, wanted its head coaching job after the ousting of Rich Rod. Throw in Miami and Florida State and four of the games premier programs are in the middle of the pack as far as relevance .

In college basketball its Kentucky who still prides itself on being an elite program but hasn’t made a final four since Tubby Smith’s first year. Arizona, though they have an excuse, and recently UCLA, which is stunning especially after the run they had at the beginning of Ben Howland’s regime, have all fallen to the middle of the pack in recent years.

In hockey its been the Maple Leafs and Canadiens. Did you know once upon a time in the 90’s that the Habs had the same number of championships (24) as the Yankees? Ever since their last cup in 1993 the franchise has been plagued by unfortunate injuries (the Saku Koivu cancer cancer scare), lackluster performances (have they had a player in the top 20 in scoring in the last 20 years?), and scandal (hi Kostitsyn twins). Oh yeah don’t forget the whole Patrick Roy asking out of Montreal fiasco that has probably led to a curse on the team. Not that we’re counting or anything.

Dont get me started on the Maple Leafs. They havent won a title in over 40 years and in the last 10 they’ve resembled the Toronto Raptors more than the franchise that has the second most cups (13) to the Habs.

(Side note: Shouldn’t Gary Bettman step in and help fix this team. The NHL needs to Leafs to be good just like the NBA needs the Lakers, or baseball needs the Dodgers to be important. This is one of the leagues flagship franchises in the country’s capital. The hockey hall of fame is there for goodness sakes. The fact that the Leafs haven’t made the playoffs in seven years and haven’t been relevant since their last division title in 2000 is a little more concerning than the fledgling Phoenix Coyotes, who should still be in Winnipeg. Yep, Bettman is back on my bad side.)

There haven't been many good times in Toronto for awhile.

In the NFL its been the Cowboys, Redskins and Raiders. All of these franchises have slid to mediocrity due in part to their ridiculous owners and their bad habits of spending money while letting the football side of things slip through their grasp.

The Redskins haven’t won a division title since their Super Bowl run in 1991 and have been a running joke since Daniel Snyder took over. They’ve made the playoffs three times with only one win to show for it. However, what’s defined them is their penchant for over paying players well past their prime. Bruce smith, Deion Sanders, Mark Brunell, Jason Taylor, and that’s for starters. Throw in their horrible coaching history lately (hi Jim Zorn, and Steve Spurring) and you wonder why fans want Dan Snyder’s head on a stake a la MacBETH.

For the Cowboys its a combination of Jerry Jones overbearing style and the lack of productivity on the field that has hindered them.

In the 90’s Dallas owned football with three titles and a high-powered offense anchored by three hall-of-farmers. Then after their last Super Bowl win over Pittsburgh in Super Bowl 30, the team hasn’t seen a playoff victory.

They’be been plagued by bad QB play, poor decision making by Jones, which includes firing Bill Parcells and trading two number one picks for Roy Williams (I’m sure the Lions still can’t believe that one) and not getting much from heralded draft picks (Mike Jenkins that’s you). Be honest, what do you know about the Cowboys now, a franchise with a rich history from Roger Staubach to Troy Amman, or their ridiculously expensive stadium with a 80 yard flatscreen in the middle of it?

As far as the Raiders go… let’s put it like this; they haven’t been over .500 since getting smoked by the Bucs in Super Bowl 37 over 8 years ago. If you want to know why then take a look at Hue Jackson’s press conference to introduce him as the team’s new coach this past week. Owner Al Davis, looking as decrepit as ever, sat at the table and ranted about Tom Cable’s personal life, comparisons of Jason Campbell to Cam Newton, and seemed more out of his mind than normal.

This is the guy who blew up Lane Kiffin at a press conference years ago, fined Cable for not executing a game plan he wrote out, drafted JaMarcus Russell, and has made so many horrible personnel decisions that no coach or player should come near Oakland. Poor Hue Jackson, I don’t think he knows what he’s getting into.

Before the Boston Celtics climbed back into contention in the NBA they had grown into a punch line. Gone were the days of Larry Bird and Kevin McHale and in were Dino Radja and Antoine Walker.

Their most memorable moment during that time came during a Rick Pitino news conference after another loss where he told the media and essentially the fans to get over themselves and that “Larry Bird ain’t walking through that door.” Right he was, though fans would’ve rather had a near 50 Bird than Ron Mercer.

So in essence every sport has seen its top franchise go through the motions and fall from grace in a haze of greed, nativity, or ignorance. Well everyone except baseball.

In the last 15 years the top tier teams in the sport have stayed on top without much static.

Sure past champions like Kansas City, Toronto and Oakland have seen their share of bad times, but their history is nothing like the Yankees, Red Sox or Dodgers.

(You’re probably wondering what about the Cubs? Flagship franchise? Yes. However, they haven’t won a damn thing in 109 years so they don’t count. Sorry Cubs fans.)

These were the bad times in Boston.

Baseball has largely protected its top franchises by not introducing a salary cap, which allows the Braves, Phillies and Angels to out spend every other team in the league and stay where they are.Sure these teams haven’t made the playoffs every year, but they always bounce back from lackluster seasons.

The Red Sox will be favorites this year after finishing third in the AL East last year in part to overspending for Carl Crawford and giving away the farm for Adrian Gonzalez.

It’s hard for any of these teams fall off of their perch and fall victim to the same plague that’s infiltrated each league over the past 15 years. Or is it?

Last week the New York Yankees announced the signing of former Tampa Bay Rays closer Rafael Soriano to be the 8th inning setup man for closer Mariano Rivera and eventually replace him.

No big deal, just the Yankees spending their endless funds to fix a problem like not having an eighth inning stopper.

However, GM Brian Cashman didn’t want to spend the money on Soriano and wanted to keep either Joba Chamberlain in the setup role or David Robertson. Owner Hal Steinbrenner overruled Cashman and handled the negotiations himself while Cashman sat in the corner and pouted.

Both sides say everything is fine but I’m not buying it.

Cashman is the game’s best GM and built a dynasty in the 90’s while the young Steinbrenners sat back and watched from The Boss’s luxury box. Cashman knows what he’s doing and what to do to keep the Yankees successful.

What Steinbrenner did was undermine Cashman and used his power to make a decision that may or may not work and also costs the Yankees a first round draft pick. That’s the kind of decision you would see Al Davis make. Uh oh.

Ok so that’s one little thing so what? Well, look at the Yankees future for a second if you will; the Yankees have been able to stay competitive after their dynasty years in the late 90’s and 2000 thanks to their huge budget and the ability to get whoever they want for any price. While they haven’t been winning championships at the rate that they would like, the Yankees are still the class of the AL East and remain the team to beat.

However, look at the current contract situations that the Yankees have:

Mark Teixiera- 8 years/180 million dollars, signed til he’s 37
A.J. Burnett – 5/82.5, signed til he’s 39
C.C. Sabathia- 7/161, signed til he’s 37
Alex Rodriguez- 10/275, signed til he’s 43
Derek Jeter- 3/51, signed til he’s 40
Jorge Posada- 4/52, signed til he’s 41
Mariano Rivera- 2/30, signed til he’s 43

In other words half of the Yankees main players on their roster are all signed well into their late 30’s or 40’s and are owed a boat load of money.

Guys like Rodriguez, Jeter and Posada are already on the downside of their careers and aren’t worth the money.

Not to mention there is the possiblility at other long term deals for Robinson Cano and Phil Hughes looming, which will add more money to their books.

The Yankees are used to shelling out lots of cash but right now there’s too much tied up in players that won’t help them contend in three years and could lead to the Yankees becoming baseball’s Cowboys.

As great as they've been, the deals given to A-Rod and Jeter could lead to the Yankees downfall.

There is no balance with them right now. There’s lots of old guys and not enough youth. Sound like Dan Snyder to you?

Another problem are the deals that the Yankees have made, which cost them two viable parts that they could use right now and both could’ve added some much needed youth to their everyday roster.

Last year they traded Austin Jackson and Ian Kennedy for Curtis Granderson essentially in a three team deal. Jackson and Granderson play the same position and Jackson hit for a higher average, stole more bases and had a higher in-base percentage than Granderson. Not to mention he’s five years younger and the perfect leadoff hitter that the Yankees so desperately need.
Kennedy went 9-10 last year for the Diamondbacks with a 3.80 ERA. While his numbers don’t seem too impressive Kennedy got stronger and stronger towards the end of the year. He’s currently penciled in as their third starter while the Yankees have no viable options in their rotation past Sabathia, Hughes, and Burnett. I’ve seen the Leafs give up on a few young guys in the past few years haven’t you?

Lastly the Yankee luster isn’t what it used to be. Guys now a days grow up hating the Yankees instead of idolizing them. No one fawns over Jeter the way they did Mickey Mantle, there’s no appreciation for Posada like there was for Yogi Berry. In the 60’s if a guy like Zach Greinke was on the market he would’ve been a pinstripe in a heartbeat, same for Cliff Lee. Now, they’d rather be a Brewer or a Phillie.

Still, the Yankees can out bid whoever they want to get their man. However, they also set the bar for other teams with just as deep of pockets to follow. How do you think the Sox got Carl Crawford or the Nats (yes, the Nats) got Jayson Werth? It’s the Yankee model; overpay for them and dare someone to leap up and get them.

So now its no longer about the pinstripes and the aura of the stadium and the pressure of the media. If you were Werth wouldn’t you rather take 126 million to play in a small market and not have the pressure of facing 1000 media faces a week wondering what’s wrong with you?

Maybe I’m going crazy, or maybe I see the writings on the wall. I know the Yankees have had to good a run of gluttony and capitalist pleasure to not have it come to a screeching hault. We’ve toed the line of smart and senseless way too long to not have it blow up in our face and I feel were getting to that point.

If the Yankees don’t solve their spending problems and incorporate some youth and practice patience then they may resemble the Celtics of the late 90’s or the Raiders of right now. They run the risk of losing their luster like Notre Dame and could become a legendary afterthought like the Habs.

Call me crazy, but Soriano deal might be the first in a long line of problems for top to bottom from the Yankees. I might be wrong, but I’ve seen it all before.


Who’s Under Center?

All that stuff I said about Kevin? Scratch that.

So, how’s your quarterback doing? For many of the teams in the National Football League—not so well.

By the end of Monday night’s 49ers-Saints game there are more than 6 controversies and 5 other questions at quarterback. On Sunday we found Kerry Collins, Bruce Gradkowski, and Luke McCown replace turnover prone QB’s, we saw Michael Vick take a strangle hold at the position over an injured Kevin Kolb, and we saw Brett Favre and Derek Anderson stink it up to the point where maybe it should be time for a change in both places (that sound you heard was Matt Leinart snickering in the background). As for Trent Edwards—eh.

In the case for Philadelphia and Vick the situation has led to a knee-jerk reaction by Andy Reid who said on Tuesday that Mike Vick is his starter. Granted he has played well by totaling almost 600 total yards in 6 quarters but he was sacked 6 times by the Lions defense… the Lions. They lost to a Super Bowl contender in Green Bay and still have to play Minnesota’s stout d-line and the Cowboys and Giants. For Reid to make such a quick decision when the plan was to develop Kevin Kolb and contend down the road will come back to haunt him, also IT’S TWO GAMES AND IT’S MICHAEL VICK!!! He’s barely a lifetime 50% passer. You ever taken statistics? You go with past trends over recent numbers because you’ve seen more of the former than the latter. Unfortunately Reid isn’t getting this memo and he’s about to find out the hard way.

For other scenario’s you have to wonder what the ramifications of replacing these quarterbacks will be. Bruce Gradkowski did do an excellent job after Jason Campbell was pulled, however it’s two games and it was the Rams. Now you have Campbell, who probably has lost trust in Cable, looking over his shoulder at a QB who isn’t a starting QB in this league. You’ve got to let him gel with his receivers (who honestly aren’t that good) and gain some trust in him. Then again, it is the Raiders, who love drama more than any other team in the league.

Then there’s Vince Young (speaking of constant drama). Young is on the hot seat, again, after getting run into the ground by the Pittsburgh Steelers defense and committing 3 turnovers and looking just plain bad. So now he’s involved in another carousel with Collins and at this point you have to wonder if maybe the Titans are close to just ending the Vince Young experiment and moving on and into the pool this draft for a new quarterback. The inconsistencies are becoming too much of a theme with Young and its year 5. Young had the job from the jump and aside from a few plays he hasn’t really had any big impact on Tennessee. This weekend at New York could be the breaking point for Vince. If he has another horrendous start and is benched for Collins, that’s it. He’s coming to the end of his rookie deal and with his poor performances popping up again it probably means that the Titans will not shell out another 4 years and X amount of dollars for a quarterback that has never lived up to the hype that he created in the 4th quarter at the Rose Bowl versus USC.

I miss college.

(side note: that 2006 Rose Bowl game, while still one of the greatest in college history, is becoming less and less relevant to the players involved years after it happened. It was a gluttony of overhyped talent that never panned out. Matt Leinart got booted out of Arizona in favor of Derek Anderson, Young has never transformed into the big play quarterback that he was billed as at Texas, Lendale White and Michael Huff are certified bums and Reggie Bush… I’ll spare him; he’s sort of having a bad week.)

So what about the other QB troubles in the league? Here’s my take on all of them:

BUFFALO

CONTROVERSY: Ryan Fitzpatrick takes over for Trent Edwards… somewhere in the world J.P. Losman is probably still wondering how he lost his job to Trent Edwards… he aint the only one.

CLEVELAND

SITUATION: Seneca Wallace or Jake Delhomme… Ryan Mallett.

TENNESSEE

CONTROVERSY: Vince Young still starting over Kerry Collins… I still hate Kerry Collins. I wouldn’t trust him to run a kwik-e-mart.

JACKSONVILLE

SITUATION: David Garrard over Luke McCown. Garrard will be the starter until the end of the season when the Jags jettison him for either Jake Locker or Mallett.

OAKLAND

CONTROVERSY: Jason Campbell vs. Bruce Gradkowski. Yet to be determined if Oakland is smart then they won’t even think about benching Campbell again for a career backup. Campbell was brought in there to be the guy and you can’t bench him twice in three weeks. On the bright side for Campbell its business as usual. Underachieving, looking lost in an offense, getting replaced by a lifetime backup, the usual.

PHILADELPHIA

CONTROVERSY: Vick over Kolb. If Andy Reid blows this then he’s getting fired at the end of the season. The Eagles could possibly lose three NFL quality quarterbacks in ten months. That’s got to be a record or something.

MINNESOTA

SITUATION: Favre… is it really inconceivable to think that Favre could be replaced by Tarvaris Jackson. Favre looks terrible. Two of three picks were absolutely horrendous throws and he has no faith in any receivers other than Visanthe Shaincoe. By the time Sidney Rice does come back from Knee surgery the Vikings might be done. The offense has lost so much mojo that even if they do turn into a heavy run based team they still won’t be an effective passing team which makes Favre useless. Not that he already wasn’t.

CAROLINA

CONTROVERSY: Jimmy Clausen over Matt Moore. It could be Casey Clausen and I would still start him over Matt Moore. Don’t be surprised if you walk into John Fox’s office this week and he’s updating his resume.

ARIZONA

Maybe there was a reason Cleveland let him go.

SITUATION: Derek Anderson with two inexperienced quarterbacks behind him. Going back to Sunday when watching the Cardinals offense I looked at Larry Fitzgerald at one point… he looks mad. Derek Anderson can’t find him and can’t throw a consistent pass. The Cardinals look lost on offense and has no identity. They are trying to keep that same high octane offense going that they had when Kurt Warner was around and its not plausible with a QB who can’t complete more than 52% of his passes. Don’t be surprised if every Cardinals player calls up Dancing With The Stars to vote Kurt Warner off and gets him back to Glendale… or kidnaps Leinart… who they never should’ve let go of in the first place. Good job Ken Whisenhunt.

COLLEGE BONUS: MIAMI

SITUATION: Jacory Harris or A.J. Highsmith. If Harris has another road stinker like he had against Ohio State, or North Carolina last year, or Virginia Tech last year, then he should stick to creating fashion trends like he did with his overalls and let Highsmith take the reins.