Monthly Archives: February 2012

Far From Burfict

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I’ll be honest with you, I’ve barely seen Vontaze Burfict play in college.

It’s not the east coast bias, it’s not that I didn’t care, it’s just that Arizona State games were never really on my radar. All I know is that their new unis make Maryland’s look like trash.

Well after the NFL combine this weekend and there are two things I have to say about him; 1, I wouldn’t pick this guy for my intramural flag football team and 2, dude grow up.

Burfict makes DeMarcus Cousins look like the pope. There were so many red flags proven correct about Burfict this weekend it made you wonder how the hell this guy was a top prospect to begin with.

His on the field performance was pathetic he was in the bottom five of most drills performed on the field. He ran the 40 yard dash in 4.93 and 5.10 seconds… AS A 6-1 248 POUND LINEBACKER!!!

For perspective Memphis DT Dontari Poe ran the 40 at a 4.86 and is 100 pounds heavier the Burfict… Huh?

(side note: because of Poe’s jaw dropping weekend in Indy he is now a possible top ten pick even though he played on a crappy team and had not one standout game in his career. I hate the combine.)

However, the worst part about Burfuct came in the interview process where he threw everyone under the bus for his shortcomings.

When asked about his lackluster play last year he said it was the coaches fault, ignoring the fact that he came into the season overweight and not in game shape. When asked about a fight with a walk-on teammate he said it was the receivers fault for hitting him too hard in practice… I won’t even touch that.

(at least Cliff Harris had a sense of humor with his arrest saying that being caught driving 125 mph was “fun.” Actually that was stupid too but I got a laugh out of it.)

The point is who would take this guy. He’s not a great athlete and is still learning how to be a man. His deflect of criticism and childish mannerisms along with the fact that he is in no way ready to be an NFL linebacker from a athletic standpoint makes him untouchable and not in a good way.

The only teams that could take Burfict are ones with a great leadership base that could whip him into shape in all senses of that phrase.

The New York Giants, Baltimore Ravens, Pittsburgh Steelers and San Francisco 49ers are the only teams who have a realistic shot of getting through to this guy, but why would they?

They’re perennial contenders who are very focused on their jobs. They don’t need to babysit the new guy in the locker room because that’s what they’re about.

The only thing Burfict can do is work at who he is on and off the field himself. Burfict’s imperfections were on display for all to see this weekend and they knocked him from a first-round pick to a fourth-round pick.

In order to keep from slipping into oblivion he needs to grow up and prove that he can be an NFL professional.

Because right now it’s a head scratcher as to how he ever became anything in college.


The End Of Joel Zumaya

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In 2006 I watched the Detroit Tigers eliminate my New York Yankees in 4 games in that year’s ALCS.

Of all of the torturous memories I have of that series (including A-Rod’s embarrassing performance) what really killed me was how helpless the Yankees looked against one man.

His name was Joel Zumaya.

Zumaya was Aroldis Chapman before he existed. Zumaya was a fireball throwing right-hander whose arms were covered in flames literally thanks to matching fire tattoos on his forearms.

My first memory of him was game 2 in Yankee stadium that year. After Justin Verlander pitched 6+ impressive innings and clung to a one-run lead Tigers manager Jim Leyland called on Zumaya to handle the middle of the Yankees order.

He did more than handle it, he dominated it.

He blew away Jason Giambi and Alex Rodriguez with ease as they looked helpless against his 100 mph fastball. As he walked off the mound I hoped to God that the Yankees would never run into him again.

Unfortunately I as well as many AL batters are getting their wish.

Zumaya ruptured another tendon in his pitching elbow yesterday ending another season in what has turned into a tragic career for him.

Zumaya hasn’t pitched a full season since his breakout year in 2006 and has missed the last two because his throwing arm can’t hold up.

What looked like the start of a promising career has turn into a repetition of setbacks that could end his career.

It’s sad because Zumaya had the kind of stuff that pitchers and coaches die for. The prospect of facing him in the AL for years and years in the seventh and eighth innings was a nightmare for me and any fan that watched their team play the Tigers.

Unfortunately for Zumaya and The Tigers that won’t be the case. His career likely is over before it ever really got started.

You always forget that the human arm wasn’t meant to throw that hard for extended periods of time. Zumaya found that out the hard way.

That ALCS performance will always be stuck in my head. I thought I was watching the next great reliever in the game who would dominate for years with an intimidating fastball that no one could hit.

I was… Unfortunately his arm didn’t see it that way.


Perry Jones Is Trash

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I’d like to make an announcement regarding this year’s NBA draft in particular towards a player who rates high on people’s boards…

Ladies and gentlemen Perry Jones III is not worth your lottery pick, as a matter of fact Perry Jones III is basura (Spanish word for trash).

After watching him in extended action this year I have come to the conclusion that the man that was projected to be a top 5 pick last year isn’t worth a top 15 pick on my board.

Jones III has all of the physical attributes a player should have. He’s 6’11” with handles, an NBA ready body with the ability to go inside or outside. At first glance he looks like the evolution of Kevin Durant, a nightmare of a matchup for a coaching staff. He’s too big for a small forward to guard and too fast for a power forward. He should be a monster, instead he’s a mess.

On a Baylor team that many had projected to be a Final Four contender this year Jones III was supposed to be its catalyst. Instead Jones III is the fourth best player on his team behind Quincy Acy, Quincy Miller and Pierre Jackson.

He doesn’t have Miller’s skill set, he doesn’t have Jackson’s tenacity, he doesn’t have Acy’s tenacity… Jones III is just a glorified role player.

The reason why Baylor has tumbled in the rankings in recent weeks is because of its inability to win tough games. Baylor has lost all four games against their fellow Big 12 top dogs Kansas and Missouri and lost to a suddenly hot Kansas State team on Saturday. In each game the Bears seemed overmatched and couldn’t seem to muster up any type of fight.

Most surprising of all is that it was Jones III that seemed to be the biggest sheep of them all.

To say Jones III has come up small when Baylor has needed him most is an understatement. Outside of the 18 he scored against Kansas in their first meeting, Jones III has scored a total of 21 points in the other 4 Baylor losses… That’s 5.2 ppg against two of the top five teams in the country and one of the teams in the Big 12.

More than numbers it’s been Jones III’s demeanor that really worries me. Plain and simple when the game gets tight Jones III gets tighter. Even in Monday’s close win over Texas Jones III seemed distant and wary of contact in the late going. He’s not a guy that’s built for the big moment. In the words of Mobb Deep that gets shook.

If I’m Scott Drew and I need a big shot late I would draw one up for Miller or Jackson. Those guys have the sack to take a big shot and live up to the moment. Jones would rather play the background

Is this a big deal for Baylor? After all of the hype I don’t think this is a Final Four squad. They’re not deep enough and haven’t shown that they can beat a tough opponent that could make them a contender. Right now they’re a Sweet 16 team at best.

If they can show out in the Big 12 tournament and win it then my mind could be changed, but right now they have work to do.

Jones III has the most work to do of anyone though. The one-time player of the year candidate and once thought of top ten pick is sliding and fast.

My advice to him is to man up and be what everyone thinks you are, a star player who NBA GM’s want to build around.

Because right now I see Jones III backing up Marshon Brooks in New Jersey instead of leading them to the playoffs.

Just saying.


The Nash Ultimatum

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As you recall I wrote a blog last year on why Rick Nash should pull a Carmelo Anthony and force a trade from the Columbus Blue Jackets to a contender.

My reasoning is that Nash, who is one of the most physically skilled players in the NHL is wasting away in Columbus and deserves to play for a team that has a shot at a Stanley Cup every year.

In his now nine year career Nash has been to the playoffs once, a four game sweep at the hands of the Detroit Red Wings. He’s been through rebuilding project after rebuilding project. He’s gone from number one pick, to Maurice Richard trophy winner, to team captain, to possibly becoming just another good player on a crappy team.

This year the Jackets tried to put some pieces around him to make the team respectable. Their additions of Jeff Carter and Steve Wisniewski we’re supposed to add some fire power to their offense and make the Jackets a playoff contender… It’s been a disaster.

Wisniewski has been out for most of the year with either injuries or suspensions and Carter has been a shell of his former self. The Jackets are last in the NHL looking at another number one pick and another rebuilding process… and it looks like Nash wants no part of it.

What started as rumors is looking like a reality. Nash gave the Jackets a list of teams he would wave his no trade clause to play for if they were going to trade him. That’s the most polite trade demand ever.

He’s had enough, enough rebuilding, enough losing, enough mediocrity. He’ll be 28 in June and doesn’t want to spend the rest if his 8 year contract rebuilding again.

You can tell that this whole process is finally starting to take its toll on him. Nash is on pace for his worst statistical season in his career and at times has looked non-existent on the ice. He needs a fresh start and a chance to succeed and he needs it now.

Now comes the hard part especially for me. Nash’s short list for teams are the Boston Bruins, Philadelphia Flyers, Los Angeles Kings and… The New York Rangers.

As a fan I’m torn. I love Nash, I think he is one of the game’s best players, I would love to have him in our red, white and blue skating alongside Marian Gaborik and Brad Richards, however the Rangers don’t really need him.

Sure he could play one of John Torterella’s top two lines and make the Rangers the favorite in the Eastern Conference, but do you know what the Rangers would have to give up to get him?

Columbus would need a quality starter, a top prospect and a pick. If it’s the Rangers were talking about Brandon Dubinsky or Artem Anisimov, then a choice of either JT Miller, Tim Erixon or Chris Kreider and a draft pick. From what organization insiders are saying, those three prospects could become serious contributors and possible all-stars…. Now you see the concern.

Trading Dubinsky would be heart breaking, next to Ryan Callahan he personifies this team’s toughness and heart every time he steps on the ice. I’ve watched Dubinsky since the lockout when he first came up and have loved every second he’s been out on the ice whether it’s scoring goals or fighting Alex Ovechkin or Mike Richards. Letting him go would be like losing a brother to be honest.

The way the Rangers are right now works. They’re a tough defensive minded team that can score enough goals to win games with a goalie that only needs one or two to do so. If we trade for Nash then we lose a little bit of that identity for the sake of a few more goals.

So what’s it gonna be, break up the band for one of the game’s best forwards or stay the course and do what’s gotten you to this point?

Interesting indeed.

There are only 7 days before the trade deadline. Rick Nash is available and could put any contender over the top for the right price.

His time in Columbus looks like its finally coming to its merciful end and he will finally have a chance to play meaningful hockey.

His wish list has been notified, prospects are in place and there is anticipation as to where he’ll end up if he actually gets traded.

One of those teams is my Rangers who are having their best season in years. Nash could either put them over the top or cost us our future. What will the Rangers do?


Consumed By Linsanity

I Believe in this man.

The Knicks are a car accident to watch. It’s such a frightening mess and I know it’s bad to look at yet I still drag myself to a television set to watch this pathetic mess almost every night.

Last year they couldn’t play defense, this year they forgot how to score.
Bill Walker is a lackadaisical mess. Toney Douglas gets too trigger happy. Amare Stoudamire is the black David Lee (I told everyone this when he was signed but no one listened to me). Carmelo Anthony has no scoring help and all Mike D’Antoni could do was sit around and watch.

I wanted D’Antoni fired last year for his constant lack of detail, I wanted him fired this offseason for a defensive coach like Mike Brown, I want him fired this year because I’m sick of seeing him and his mustache.

Yet none of this matters right now in New York because Knick fans are on cloud nine thanks to a 6-3, 200 pound, undrafted point guard from Harvard that has become an overnight sensation.

His name is Jeremy Lin, and he is a gift from the heavens above.

Ok maybe I’m exaggerating a little, but jeez not even last year’s acquisition of Melo brought this much buzz an joy to the basketball Mecca that is the NYC.

Lin’s emergence came at a time when the Knicks desperately needed some good news. At 8-15 and flirting with a disastrous season that would’ve surely ended the D’Antoni era for the Knicks, Lin has caught fire and has led the Knicks through their best stretch of the season.

He’s been the missing piece that the fast pace D’Antoni offense has needed to get going. A pick and roll point guard with excellent vision and passing skills that is able to create shots for his teammates as well as fend for himself offensively.

Funny thing was that he was almost released to make room for the return of Baron Davis, I guess that won’t be happening now.

Ever since he stepped onto the court against the New Jersey Nets Lin has created a buzz across the league and has turned skeptics into believers.

He schooled Deron Williams and ran circles around him two Saturdays ago, he treated Devin Harris like a rag doll, he embarrassed John Wall with a sick crossover and dunk that was replayed over and over on Sportscenter, his performance against the Lakers last Friday will be talked about for years, and he showed toughness and moxie in gutting out a win in Minnesota.

He’s done it all from knocking down clutch free throws, reigniting Tyson Chandler’s game and leaving Derek Fisher flat-footed as he spun by for a highlight worthy lay in.

Yeah, I’m in love with this guy. But it took me a while to get into him.

Like most people I had to actually see him to believe him. Watching highlights of Lin didn’t tell the whole story. Yeah it was nice to see him drive at will against Utah and destroy the Nets already grim confidence but I wanted more.

I wanted to know three things about Lin while everyone was already crowning him the next big thing:

1. Can he handle the mounting pressure that comes with being an athlete in New York?
2. How does he deal with failure in a game and can he still stay on point when he’s not on his A game?
3. How will he play with the return of Stat and Melo (yeah, forgot about then right?)

My first question got answered on Friday against the Los Angeles Lakers.

The last few times the Lakers have hit The Big Apple it’s been Kobe Bryant’s town without question. He has carved his own name into Madison Square Garden lore with huge performances like scoring 61 points in a game there just years ago.

It was the perfect test for my Lin theory, play arguably the best player in the game and keep the Knicks on pace with the Lakers.

That was the first full time that I actually got to watch Lin, safe to say I was shocked by what I saw.

He didn’t just keep the Knicks in the game, he controlled it. He dominated the pace and flow of the game by continuously attacking the rim, floating lobs to Chandler, coming up steals on the defensive end and destroying Fisher and Steve Blake when the ball was in his hands.

He looked like a younger Steve Nash, honest to god. Just his style of play and the way he maneuvered around the Lakers reminded me of the two-time NBA MVP.

Every time the Knicks needed a big play or a big shot the ball found its way to Lin. He never backed down and always came through. 38 points & 7 assists later I was starting to get sold on the NBA’s Tim Tebow.

(yep I made a Tebow reference but all of the similarities and hype and mass coverage are there. The big difference? Lin can ball out, Tebow’s a bum… Just saying.)

The next test came the next night against the Timberwolves in a hyped up battle versus Ricky Rubio.

The main reason I wanted to see him fail is because I wanted to see if he was more like Eli Manning or Tony Romo.

When things don’t go Manning’s way his demeanor doesn’t change and he pressed on. For Romo he panics and loses his cool. I wanted to see if when things get too tight of Lin folds or rises to the occasion.

(yeah I fit an Eli reference in there, so what? By the way did you know that the New York Giants are Super Bowl Champions? God that makes me happy)

The T-Wolves game was a game of two halves. Lin was his usual self in the first half 7-12, 4 dimes and running the offense efficiently. In the second half Lin was totally taken out of rhythm. He only hit 1-12 shots and the Wolves forced him into bad shots and 4 turnovers.

However, I got the impression from Lin that even in tough stretches he still doesn’t get rattled.

Even with all of the turnovers and with his shots not finding the net he still continued to set up his other teammates including Steve Novak’s game tying three with less than a minute left. He also scored the winning point from the free throw line after being fouled getting to the basket.

Even without a dominant performance Lin still found a way to pull out a win for the Knicks. That was enough to make me even more of a believer.

Now the third and most interesting task is at hand… Can Lin, Melo and Stat all work together to be effective?

Carmelo Anthony has received a lot of bad press in the last week with all of the Linsanity spreading through NY.

It’s as if we forget that we wanted Melo here in the first place, it’s not his fault that the Knicks traded the farm to get him (thanks James Dolan). Melo has always needed a point guard to stabilize this offense to make more effective. Sorry Toney Douglas wasnt the answer.

With Lin’s emergence Melo and Amar’e for that matter now have a lot less pressure on their shoulders to score.

The main question is can Melo let Lin run the offense without asking for the ball too much?

As dynamic of a scorer as he is, Melo holds onto the ball for too long in too many stretches of the game. With Lin at the point now Melo will have to find his rhythm in the game and let it come to him.

Besides elevating Chandler, Landry Fields has found his game and confidence and Novak has become a reliable shooter off of the bench. The Knicks have gone from a two horse team to an actual team with a good rotation.

If Melo can stay dominant while letting this mix still cook then the Knicks will be making noise come playoff time.

If not then he’ll be the one taking most of the criticism if the Knicks go back to struggling.

The next stage of Linsanity is upon us. He won’t be throwing up 25 shots a game any more or dropping 38 on defenses, but I believe that after watching Jeremy Lin he is the answer to a lot of the Knicks woes.

Lin has dazzled America, balled out on every opponent that he’s faced and is getting better by the day.

In a city consumed by sports with the Giants winning Super Bowls, the Rangers leading the NHL and the Yankees always on the back pages, the Knicks have wiggled their way back into the minds of New Yorkers.

Linsanity is here and hopefully it’s not a flash in the pan.


I’ll Miss AJ Burnett

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I'll miss the man and the pies.

Truth be told I really did like AJ Burnett.

I love what he brought to the New York Yankees organization. He was the screwball in an overly professional environment that livened everyone up that was around him and made the clubhouse a nuthouse.

He for sure wasn’t the prototypical Yankee. He had the most tats on any Yankee I’ve ever seen, he was almost never clean shaven and his shaving cream was mostly used for his infamous after game pies to the face (which I think everyone loved in N.Y.).

But that was AJ.

He gave the Yankees a new identity. At the beginning of 2009 Burnett, C.C. Sabathia & Nick Swisher were all part of a wave of newbies that came to the Bronx and turned it on its head. They were all tatted up, Mohawk wearing guys that changed the culture of the Yankees internally and made things more entertaining.

Burnett more than anybody else was the catalyst of it all. His game ending pies became a fan favorite highlight after big wins and his arm helped produce some big wins in his first season in New York.

His seven inning gem in August of 09 against the Red Sox helped keep the Sox at bay as the Yankees eventually won the AL East. His best performance came in the World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies. After Cliff Lee put the Yankees in a one game hole Burnett came out in game 2 and pitched the game of his life to tie the series. In seven innings and with nine strikeouts Burnett flipped the World Series and turned it in the Yankees favor.

Without him the Yankees don’t win the World Series that year. That’s why I appreciate Burnett so much.

Was he maddening to watch? Absolutely. Burnett has all of the talent in the world; a top notch fastball, nasty breaking pitches and when he’s on he can be unhittable.

But when he’s bad he’s putrid.

He’s one of the wildest pitchers in the game. His location can be non existent, he can walk batters as consistently as he can throw wild pitches. Burnett mentally has never always been there. When he fails it affects him for starts at a time.

He presses too much. Once he walks a batter he panics, one walk leads to another, then another, then a hit, then a run, then before you know it Burnett is a mess and the Yankees are in trouble.

The worst case of this was last year against the White Sox. The Yankees had a 13-0 lead in the fourth inning. My buddy Mike sent me a text message saying “AJ is gonna find a way to give all 13 of those back. WATCH!” Sure enough it was 13-7 in the bottom of the fifth with two runners in scoring position and no outs when Joe Girardi pulled him.

I wanted AJ to succeed so badly because he was just a great dude and those memories of 09 were still fresh in my brain… But he made me and all Yankees fans want to kill him. When Burnett pitched I don’t think there was one Yankees fan who didn’t have a bottle of Jack Daniels next to them because you needed it to watch him.

The pitching coaches couldn’t fix him and he sure as hell couldn’t do it himself. In the end in order for the Yankees to have a shot at winning another title they had to get rid of one of the main catalysts to its last title.

Trading Burnett was the right thing to do in the long run for the Yankees. One of the Yankees weaknesses last year was its rotation and after acquiring Michael Pineda and Hideki Kuroda they seem to have fixed their problems (at least on paper). After the two additions there was no room for Burnett and his end was seemingly eminent.

Now he’s gone and he’s taken his pies with him.

As maddening as he was I really like AJ. Pittsburgh is gonna love his antics, the way he brings guys close together and how he livens up the clubhouse.

Hopefully it’s pitching coaches can keep him focused and on point and Burnett can put together some good seasons. The guy deserves it.

Sure he couldn’t find the plate if he tried in stretches and was wildly erratic… but AJ Burnett helped the Yankees win a World Series and made life fun for all in the process.

That more than outweighs all the other stuff.


Typical Giants

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There was a moment after the confetti had fallen after the New England Patriots had taken the slow death march off of the Lucas Oil Stadium turf after losing their second Super Bowl to the New York Giants when ESPN interviewed Justin Tuck sitting on the Giants bench.

Tuck was slouched over looking as if he couldn’t believe what just transpired. Not just the Super Bowl win, but just the Giants overall run. He was exhausted and confused. Exhausted after once again making Tom Brady’s supposed historic night a living hell, confused as to just how the in the hell the Giants were able to win a Super Bowl after the season that they just had.

You’ve probably read my last three articles pertaining to the Giants and they weren’t nice. I bashed GM Jerry Reese for not retooling the Giants properly after Steve Smith, Kevin Boss and Barry Cofield skipped town. I wanted Perry Fewell fired, I wanted our defense euthanized after the Saints debacle, after the Redskins loss in December I was done with this team. 7-7, losers of 5 of 6, this team had little hope of making the playoffs let alone winning a Super Bowl.

You know what I forgot about… It’s the New York Giants. No matter how bad they look, how poor they play, how much they make you want to hang yourself from the tallest redwood, they somehow find a way to figure it out.

This run was just typical Giants. Start off hot, lose a few well played games, go through a stretch where you look like a train wreck, put your backs against the wall, then go on a run where you look like the best team in football.

It’s maddening I tell you.

The same team that let Drew Brees run through them like a run away train is the same team that blew the doors off of the Atlanta Falcons and embarrassed them. The same defense that couldn’t stop Aaron Rodgers in week 13 beat him up and dominated him in the playoffs. The same team that lost four straight games to three division leaders and a .500 team beat every division leader and a dangerous 11 win team at home.

The team that looked like a discombobulated mess was the same team that even when Tom Brady was carving them up in the second and third quarters kept a cool head and finished it off in the fourth.

Last night’s Super Bowl win came with the normal heart attacks, sweaty palms and a few screams that come with watching the Giants play, but for the first time in my life of watching agame I was completely calm.

The front four wasn’t pressuring Brady, the offense wasn’t scoring touchdowns, Hakeem Nicks and Ahmad Bradshaw almost blew it with fumbles… But everything seemed perfectly fine.

Maybe it’s the fact that I’ve become used to this, or the fact that Eli Manning’s personality has affected not only the Giants team but the fans too. The same demeanor that Eli has been killed for since he entered the league is what won the Giants another ring.

Tuck spoke about it at length saying that even when the Pats offense was in a rhythm that he felt ok like nothing was wrong. Even when things were looking bleak everyone from the defense to the coaching staff to the offense was calm.

The offense which was known for its big play capability never forced the action. It was never forced into bad plays and took what the Pats D gave it even it was a field goal. Victor Cruz was a decoy all night as the Pats secondary doubled him at every chance, Nicks had ten catches mostly for first downs and nothing more (we’ll get Mario Manningham in a moment). It was all about patience and in a year after the Giants committed the most turnovers in the league, they wouldn’t budge an stayed patient.

For a defense that makes its living off of killing QB’s last night was a true test for the Giants especially it’s front four. Tuck, Jason Pierre-Paul, Osi Umenyoira, Linval Joseph and others just couldn’t touch Brady. Give Bill Belichick credit for formulating a game plan to keep the Giants pass rush at bay. In the midst of Brady’s 16 straight completions there was rarely a white shirt in his face.

Fewell could’ve went back to the old Fewell and just started blitzing at will to get to Brady. Instead he let it all play out. He kept rushing the front four and keeping linebackers Michael Boley and Jacquan Williams in the middle of the field to protect against the run.

Eventually the pass rush did get to Brady as it forced his only interception of the game and his overthrow of Wes Welker which would’ve put the game away instead it forced a punt.

(side note: I know Cris Collinsworth said it was a bad throw, Skip Bayless and Rob Parker killed Brady for that throw… But Welker should’ve made that catch. When you get two hands on the ball you should be able to haul it in and he should’ve. For a guy that has 122 catches and is routinely called the best at his position those are the kinds of catches you have to make. Poor throw or not you are paid to catch balls like the one Brady threw.)

You saw the rest, Manning to Manningham made all of us believe that this game was the in the bag for the Giants (it’s not better than Manning to Tyree but it was just as amazing). Manningham makes two more huge catches, Ahmad Bradshaw scores a weird touchdown (honestly I’m with Coughlin on this one. He should’ve made a firm judgement on it but in the end six points is six points and field goals aren’t sure things). Then Tuck plants Brady in the ground for the second time leaving the Pats hopes up to a failed hail Mary.

Yep, typical Giants. It’s never easy.

At the end of the day it means different things for everyone in the organization.

It means Eli will finally get his props as being one of the game’s best QB’s and hopefully the NFL network will place in in it’s top 100 players this year.

It means that hate him or love him Tom Coughlin is one of the game’s best coaches by winning his second title. Rex Ryan may get all the buzz in the city but Coughlin is the top dog of New York. Sports Illustrated polled players before the season and Coughlin was voted as a coach no one wanted to play for. After his second ring is that really a wise assessment of him?

For Justin Tuck its vindication of sorts. He was criticized by for Giants Antonio Pierce & Michael about his toughness for not playing through a neck injury. Tuck had a bad season due to his ailment but in the end he was the engine that drove the Giants defense.

He was the only Giant to get to Brady and he did it three times, two for sacks, one for a safety. He came through when the Giants needed him most and with his second title he can take his place along side Lawrence Taylor & Strahan as the most important Giant defenders ever.

For Victor Cruz it means a new deal, for Brandon Jacobs it’s a ride off into the sunset as his days as a Giant might be done. For Manningham he will be forever apart of Giants and Super Bowl lore with his catch.

For the Giants in particular they are just plain old champions. After losing players to free agency and injury, having Plaxico rip the team and Coughlin after signing with the Jets. Losing 5 of 6 in sometimes pitiful fashion and having to run the table to make playoffs they pulled it off.

They are the kings of New York, kings of the NFC, and kings of the NFL.

Eli is elite, Coughlin is a legend, Fewell still has a job and I have a new championship T-Shirt.

When asked by the NFL Network’s Marshall Faulk why the Giants can’t play like they did last night all if the time Tuck just shook his head and said “I couldn’t tell you.”

Typical Giants.